Basic Protection – National Immunisation Programme (NIP)

Basic Protection – National Immunisation Programme (NIP)

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The Malaysian National Immunisation Programme (NIP) was introduced in the early 1950s. Our Malaysian NIP was designed based on the World Health Organisation (WHO) Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). The EPI recommends that all countries immunise against 6 childhood diseases, however our Malaysian National Immunisation Programme (NIP) has expanded protection against 12 major childhood diseases

1. What diseases does the National Immunisation Programme (NIP) cover today?

Our NIP protects Malaysian children against 12 major childhood diseases.

What are the 12 disease preventable under the NIP?

Diphtheria

An infectious disease caused by bacteria that live in the mouth and throat of the infected person

Haemophilus influenzae type B (HIB)

A serious infection that mainly affects children under 5 years.

Hepatitis B

Infection of the liver by the Hepatitis B virus.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

Most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) that causes cervical cancer which is the third most common cancer in women.

Japanese encephalitis (JE)

Infection of the brain caused by JE virus.

Measles

A highly contagious viral disease.

Mumps

A viral infection that is the most common cause of inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)

Pertussis – Whooping Cough

Highly contagious, with violent and persistent coughing that may cause a child to struggle to breathe and, turn blue (cyanosed).

Poliomyelitis (polio)

An infectious and incurable viral disease that attacks the nervous system.

Rubella

Also known as German measles that may cause abnormalities to the foetus.

Tetanus

Also known as lockjaw, caused by bacteria toxins that attacks the body’s nervous system.

Tuberculosis (TB)

A disease that commonly infects the lungs, but can also attack other parts such as the kidney, spine, skin, intestines and brain.

2. Where can our children receive their vaccinations under the National Immunisation Programme (NIP)?

The National Immunisation Programme (NIP) vaccinations are provided free-of-charge at all government clinics across the country. They are also available at private clinics, where you may have to pay a small fee.

3. When does my child have to get these vaccines?

There is a National Immunisation Programme (NIP) schedule (see below). It is important to follow this schedule closely as doctors and other public health experts have worked hard to come up with the optimal vaccination schedule, affording the most complete and safest protection possible. It is not advisable to skip or delay vaccines, as this will leave the child vulnerable to disease.

NIP Eng

  1. BCG stands for Bacille Calmette-Guerin, which is the vaccine to protect against tuberculosis.
  2. DTaP is the combination vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. This vaccine is given together with the Hib and polio vaccines.
  3. IPV stands for inactivated polio vaccine.
  4. Hib stands for Haemophilus influenzae type b.
  5. MMR stands for measles, mumps and rubella.
  6. MR stands for measles and rubella, given to those born before July 2015.
  7. DT is a booster dose given to protect against diphtheria and tetanus.
  8. HPV stands for Human Papillomavirus. The vaccine is available to 13-year-old girls in 2 doses over a period of 6 months.
  9. JE stands for Japanese Encephalitis. The vaccine is only given in Sarawak.
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